FAQ


What am I doing here?
Do you have to be a scientist, engineer or someone working in the space sector to attend?
Do I have to pay?
How many people are coming?
How do I get there?
Where can I stay?
What can I do? How can I participate in a SpaceUp?
The Session Grid

What am I doing here?
To find out more about what an UNCONFERENCE is, check our HP and http://spaceup.org     back

Do I have to be a scientist, engineer or someone working in the space sector to attend?
No, of course not! This is the key idea behind the SpaceUp: the variety of backgrounds of its attendees. Everyone can attend, and they all share one passion: space and technology. And sometimes, Aliens.     back

Do I have to pay?
Yes, the fee is 25 EUR and includes access to the venue, coffeebreak and lunch (to be confirmed) – and some goodies.     back

How many people are coming?
We hope that we can fill the room fitting 150 people! Please check the list of participants for more information.     back

How do I get there?

  • By Car
    The address is:
    Technisches Museum Wien
    Mariahilfer Straße 212, 1140 Wien, Austria ‎ +43 1 899980
  • By Public Transport
    Tramway:
    Lines 52 oder 58 – Station Penzinger Straße/Anschützgasse
    Line 10 – Johnstraße/Linzer Straße
    Bus:
    10 A – Johnstraße/Linzer Straße
    57 A – Anschützgasse
    Metro:
    U3 – Johnstraße + 10 minutes to walk
    U4 – Schönbrunn + 10 minutes to walk
    Take the U4 Metroline (green) to Station Schoenbrunn. Exit towards Grünbergstraße (Schönbrunner Brücke), and cross the bridge onto Winkelmannstrasse. Follow it straight ahead, with the park on your left handside.  The Museum is the big building behind the park, hard to miss.

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Where can I stay?

Here’s a list of nearby hostels and hotels – of course you can also check booking.com, couchsurfing.org or 9flats.com!
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What can I do? How can I participate in a SpaceUp?

Good question! Here are a few things you might want to do:

  • T-5 Talks:
    If you’re itching to give a presentation with slides, we have just the format for you: it’s called Ignite. Each speaker gets 5 minutes to talk, with 20 slides that rotate automatically every 15 seconds.
  • 60s to land
  • more…

At SpaceUp, we call our Ignite-format talks T minus 5. These are usually the only talks that are scheduled beforehand, because they take a bit more preparation and planning than most unconference sessions. They’re definitely worth the effort.
For inspiration, see the awesome talk by Andy Cochrane on why space is boring, or another about how to give an Ignite talk.     back

The Session Grid
A SpaceUp has sessions going on at the same time. And to keep up with them, you need: the session grid. This is a big board with all the available sessions listed on it.
At every SpaceUp, the grid starts empty at the beginning; only breaks and Ignite sessions (see abow) are scheduled beforehand. Sessions are proposed by writing a synopsis on and sticking it in one of the slots on the grid. The grid fills up quickly over the course of the morning, but it grows and changes as the day goes on and more ideas surface.
A session can take a few different formats: a presentation with Q&A, a demo, a panel of experts, or a roundtable. Some of the most interesting sessions are proposed as open-ended questions. (“Should NASA continue developing hardware?” “What’s the cheapest way to do science in space?”) Project demonstrations make great sessions, too, especially when they’re hands-on.
There will be at least one session about SpaceUp itself, to talk about what we can do better, both on the spot and for the next SpaceUp. You’re more than welcome to start other sessions about SpaceUp, especially if you think there’s something wrong.     back

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